noodleFeet : All Wired and Ready

When your baby is learning to walk, you make sure its near soft things and away from stairs so that when the inevitable fall occurs, they don’t collapse into pieces. When your baby is a robot learning to walk, bungie chords and harnesses are also needed. And in the case with noodle, who is delicate and wobbly like a skittish baby fawn, I am sparing no precaution!

The noodle Harness

noodlefeet walking steps

Robots get rigging. Mark took the time this weekend and installed a guide wire on the ceiling over our work table. A “leash” hangs down from this wire and clips on to noodle’s smashing neon-yellow harness which wraps around all four of his legs. If he loses his balance, he won’t have very far to fall before the leash pulls tight and catches him.

Calibration!

noodlefeet servos motors walking

Before assembling noodle for his big day, I had to calibrate all of the servo motors to 90º. Only then could I screw the gears to the motor shafts, as well as connect the pulley bits from the secondary servo motors on each leg to the bendy bits.

In the end, once all of the final parts were attached to one another,  I was pleased with how solidly he stands on his own. Hopefully I can figure out the right way to distribute balance so that he can lift up his feet and walk.

Wiring up the Bread

noodlefeet first brain

Lastly, this afternoon I taped an Arduino down to the end of a breadboard and fashioned some male headers so that the servo motors could easily plug-in and tether to their appropriate pins. The breadboard itself is taped directly to the leash so that it will move with noodle as he walks… or falls.

When is he walking?

So, he’s poised and ready. The big moment will either come tonight some time or tomorrow after Mark is home from work for the weekend. Either way, I’ll be sure to take LOTS of footage of my wobbly child as he navigates across the table for the first time. =O

Wish us luck!

Readers Comments (1)

  1. It’s fun to see your progress, and I’m amused by the tiny bell!

    If you’re not going to make your own PCB for this robot, it might be nice to use the A-Star 32U4 Prime: https://www.pololu.com/product/3105 It’s very much like an Arduino, but if you install male headers and a wire or two for the power, you can plug your eight servos directly into it.

    Reply

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